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Maternal Mortality in Cameroon: An Urgent Need for Action

By: Nehsuh Carine Alongifor, Women Deliver Young Leader

Maternal mortality continues to escalate in most African countries and the target to reduce maternal deaths and ensure universal access to family planning services is far from being met. Cameroon is no exception; according to different national demographic and health surveys, even with the rising prevalence of modern contraception, maternal mortality has increased over the years with 430 per 100,000 live births in 1991 to 430 in 1998, 669 in 2004, and 782 in 2011. Read more...

Reaping the Demographic Dividend: the Role of Young People in Sustainable Development

By: Isaac Ejakhegbe, Women Deliver Young Leader

Young people between the ages of 10 and 24 make up 1.8 billion  of the world population—they are strong, vibrant and have the potential to bring about huge development and social progress in any economy. With more young people concentrated in low- and middle-income countries, developing nations need to harness the strengths and advantages of having a surge in the youth population, one  that only needs to be educated and empowered in order to turn the fortune of their nations around. Read more...

Global Goals: It’s time to raise our sights for girls’ rights

By: Plan International; Originally posted on Thomson Reuters

With the New Year marking the official start to implementation of the sustainable development goals (SDGs), we must commit to decisive steps to transform the lives of girls, who are so often left behind, says child rights organisation Plan International. The world’s governments have committed to use the next 15 years to make sweeping development gains to end hunger, achieve gender equality, ensure sustainable use of the planet’s resources and end preventable deaths. Read More...

Finding a Role in the SDGs: My Experience at UNGA

By: Inaam Abuelsoud; Women Deliver Young Leader

Waking up to an email notification on a stuffy summer day in August, I read excitedly all the events scheduled to take place the following month in the unordered, bustling city of New York. Nervousness creeps over me, as I interrogate why I’m not as actively involved in advocacy as I should be. I think of my work and why I have been invited to take part in the unfolding of the global plan for development. I am exhausted thinking through the preparation I must undertake for this journey; how will I articulate the current project I have been working on and how does this apply to the SDGs? Read more...

Heed past lessons to deliver for girls and women – and drive progress for all

By: Jill Sheffield; Originally Posted on Thomson Reuters 

There was a lot on the line for the world’s girls and women last week as global leaders meet at UN headquarters for a once-in-a-generation summit on international development. Last time around, 15 years ago, I was there – and it didn’t turn out so well for girls and women. We’re more optimistic today, with the UN Secretary-General and many global leaders personally pledging to make the Sustainable Development Goals work for girls and women. Read More...

 

Women Deliver’s Commitment to new Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health

By: Brittany Tatum, Women Deliver

2015 and beyond is a moment in time where we are intensely focused on the world and its people. It is a time in which we could see the end of extreme poverty, preventable maternal deaths, and begin to reverse the effects of climate change. While these goals may seem like an unbelievably large undertaking, they can be achieved; but no one person can do it alone. One of the best ways to see progressive change is to work through partnerships. Which is exactly what Women Deliver believes, and exemplifies. Another great example of progress through partnership is Every Woman Every Child, and they’ve been leading the charge for the past five years. Read More...

Education and Health: the Spandrels to Build a Gender Equal World

By: Graca Machel and Dr. Mark Dybul; Originally Posted on: Huffington Post 

This year, as students return to school, we should think about young people as individuals, rather than as issues. For any individual woman to gain equal opportunity, what would she need as a girl? Education and health. Intertwining education and health can ensure that girls not only survive, but thrive and reach their full potential. Separately, education and health are important for every girl. Linked together, they could change the world. Read More...

Time to Make the new Sustainable Development Goals Matter Most for Girls and Women

By: Katja Iversen & Brittany Tatum, Women Deliver

Imagine a world where no woman dies giving life, where no baby is born with HIV, where every girl is able to attend school and get a quality education, and where everybody—and that includes girls and women —can fulfill their potential and help accelerate progress for all. That world is within reach —and it is time for global action. Read More...

Is Investing in Nutrition the Key to Achieving the Global Goals?

By: Brittany Tatum; Originally Posted on Global Citizen

There are an estimated 795 million people in the world who don’t have enough food to lead a healthy, active life. That’s 1 out of 9 experiencing malnutrition, sometimes with devastating outcomes. Malnutrition contributes to roughly half of the 8.8 million child deaths per year. According to the World Health Organization, malnutrition is the biggest trigger for multiple diseases and risk factors, including stunted growth, obesity-related conditions, and iron-deficiency anemia. However, there are actions that can improve nutrition and the health of girls and women. Read More...

What happens when you invest in girls and women? It’s simple: We all win

By: Katja Iversen; Originally Posted on Devex 

As the third International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, draws to a close, questions about how we will fund the sustainable development agenda and broader global development are being debated.

Like any negotiation process, policymakers must make tough decisions to maximize limited resources. However, one issue policymakers cannot afford to compromise on is the health, rights and well-being of girls and women. Read More...

Girls in sport: A powerful game changer for the SDGs

By: Katja Iversen, Maria Bobenrieth; Originally posted on Devex

We’ve all heard stories of professional athletes who have defied the odds to keep playing the sport they love. Take Maria Toor Pakay who grew up in South Waziristan, Pakistan, where playing squash, or any sport, was for boys only; but Maria couldn’t be kept off the court. She pretended to be a boy in order to keep playing and today is Pakistan’s number one squash player.

Maria refused to let society restrict her, and instead, she showed us all what girls can do. Now she is championing change through a foundation that helps girls access education and sport — contributing to a stronger, more just Pakistan. Read More...

21 ways the SDGs can have the best impact on girls

By: Anna Leach; Originally posted on The Guardian

How can the sustainable development goals (SDGs) tackle the underlying gender inequality that holds girls back? Our expert panel had these suggestions. 

Invest in research: The effectiveness of goals and policies aimed at reducing gender-based inequalities continues to be undermined by knowledge gaps. We need a better understanding of how gender inequalities are produced, reproduced or challenged during the transition to adulthood and between the generations. Read More...

 

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