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Updates


Ann Starrs: “Half a Million Reasons”

Ann Starrs, president of Family Care International, wrote an article, “Half a Million Reasons,” in the current issue of Public Service Review: International Development. In it, Starrs provides an update on progress toward MDG 5, on the challenges that still lie in the way of its fulfillment, and on recent causes for hope.

National Geographic on Maternal Health

The December issue of National Geographic has a great piece on maternal and child health in the central part of India's Maharashtra state. The author, Tina Rosenberg, focuses on the Jamkhed program that trains local midwives to administer health services and deliver babies safely.

PBS Feature on Maternal Mortality

Guatemala has one of the highest rates of maternal mortality in Latin America, where death during childbirth is 20 times more likely than in the developed world. The majority of these deaths are preventable, with access to sufficient medical care — a challenge for many Guatemalans, particularly those in remote areas.

How Will Obama Deliver for Women?

One of the many remarkable and heartening aspects of the 2008 U.S. election is that it has engaged the entire world. As we have already heard from countless friends, colleagues, and supporters, we are suddenly living in a time not just of daunting challenges, but of inspiring opportunity and hope.

Q&A on Maternal Health Advocacy

Professor Jeremy Shiffman, a political scientist at Syracuse University who has a particular interest in maternal, newborn, and child health, has been developing a new field of enquiry to analyze the critical factors underlying successful political advocacy for global health causes.

BBC Documentary on Maternal Health

The BBC has produced a new multi-series documentary called “Survival” that includes a 45-minute look at maternal health in Bangladesh. To capture the true story, the filmmakers traveled to a remote area in the North East of Bangladesh and filmed the labor of a young woman, Morjina, in her small hut with the aid of traditional birth attendant, or dhai.

Faith-Based Organizations Unite

More than 75 religious leaders and representatives of Hindu, Buddhist, Sikh, Jewish, Christian and Muslim faith-based organizations formed a global interfaith network to strengthen cooperation against the global issues of maternal death, AIDS, and poverty.

Faith-Based Organizations Unite

More than 75 religious leaders and representatives of Hindu, Buddhist, Sikh, Jewish, Christian and Muslim faith-based organizations formed a global interfaith network to strengthen cooperation against the global issues of maternal death, AIDS, and poverty.

Spotlight on Sierra Leone

There was a great feature in the Washington Post this weekend all about maternal mortality in Sierra Leone. Unfortunately, Sierra Leone has an extremely high maternal mortality rate -- 1 in 8 women die during childbirth.

New Tool to Track Maternal Mortality

The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) has introduced a new tool in India to help health-care experts, policymakers, and local communities understand the causes of the high rates of maternal mortality across the country. The tool, known as the Maternal and Perinatal Death Inquiry and Response (MAPEDIR), has collected data and analyzed the cases of some 1,600 women. 

Why is Africa Plagued with Maternal Mortality?

There's a great blog post on RH Reality Check today about maternal mortality in Africa: On Maternal Mortality, Why Africa Falls So Far Behind. In the post, Edna Adan Ismail lists some of the reasons why African women die in pregnancy and childbirth.

Giving Birth in Afghanistan

Oxfam took Alix Fazzina, a top photojournalist, to Badakhshan, Afghanistan, where she met and photographed the families behind the statistics and the doctors, midwives and traditional birth attendants trying to save women’s lives.

Report Card on Maternal Mortality

A new report on maternal mortality, released by UNICEF, highlights the risks faced during pregnancy and childbirth by women in developing countries.

Misoprostol Approved in Uganda

The Uganda government approved the use of the low-cost drug, misoprostol, to treat and prevent excessive bleeding in mothers during childbirth to curb the high maternal mortality rates.

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