News

15 Journalists, 15 Voices for Girls and Women

Contact:
Jessica Malter, Women Deliver
jmalter@womendeliver.org

Stephanie Platis, Global Health Strategies
splatis@globalhealthstrategies.com

On International Women’s Day, Women Deliver honors fifteen journalists championing the health and rights of girls and women through their reporting

March 5, 2015, New York, NY – To celebrate International Women’s Day (March 8), Women Deliver is honoring 15 journalists for their consistent and game-changing coverage of maternal, sexual and reproductive health and rights issues at the global and national levels.

The 15 honorees are women and men from 12 countries across Africa, Asia and North and South America. They have used their voices and media platforms to bring attention to issues like female genital mutilation in Liberia, Cameroon and Tanzania; women’s rights abuses in India and Pakistan; teenage pregnancy in Uganda; contraceptive access in the Philippines and Senegal; and sexual exploitation around the World Cup in Brazil.

"Our honorees aren't just reporting from behind a desk – they are on the front lines and their coverage saves lives. They go far beyond what many would do, even putting their own lives in harm’s way, because women’s stories matter to all of us,” says Women Deliver CEO Katja Iversen. “This is no easy feat, which is why we are proud to recognize them today. Their passion for and dedication to improving girls’ and women’s lives is evident in every article they write and every story they tell.”

The 15 honorees were selected from a pool of more than 100 nominations submitted by Women Deliver’s partners. An internal review board evaluated the candidates based on their dedication to girls’ and women’s health and rights, the quality and consistency of their reporting on the issues and the impact of their work in the newsroom and beyond.

"Maternal and reproductive health topics are often sidelined by news managers who see them as soft news best used in the living sections of newspapers,” said Director of International Media Programs at Population Reference Bureau, Deborah Mesce, who leads the organization’s Women’s Edition initiative. “While we know that these topics are crucial to global and national development, just as important as politics, we need strong, committed journalists to change the newsroom mindset. These journalists are doing that by producing accurate, compelling stories that inform the public and persuade policymakers to act."

Starting today, Women Deliver will open an online voting contest that will allow people to cast a vote for the journalist who inspires them most. Voting will close on March 20 at 11:59 PM EST, and the three journalists with the most votes will receive scholarships to attend Women Deliver’s 2016 conference, which will be held in Copenhagen, Denmark, from May 16-19, 2016.

To learn more about each journalist, please visit our website and follow the conversation on Twitter using #15Voices4Women.

Full List of Journalist Honorees (In alphabetical order by country)

  •  Florencia Goldsman, Argentina
  •  Tareq Salahuddin, Bangladesh
  •  Comfort Mussa, Cameroon
  •  Chi Yvonne Leina, Cameroon
  •  Stella Paul, India
  •  Lucy Maroncha, Kenya
  •  Mae Azango, Liberia
  •  Farahnaz Zahidi Moazzam, Pakistan
  •  Rina Jimenez-David, Philippines
  •  Maimouna Gueye, Senegal
  •  Rose Mwalongo, Tanzania
  • Brian Mutebi, Uganda
  • Catherine Mwesigwa, Uganda
  • Allyn Gaestel, USA
  • Jina Moore, USA/Kenya

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ABOUT WOMEN DELIVER: 

Women Deliver is a global advocacy organization bringing together voices from around the world to call for action to improve the health and well-being of girls and women. Women Deliver works globally to generate political commitment and resource investments to reduce maternal mortality and achieve universal access to reproductive health.

For more information, visit www.womendeliver.org.

Entry Comments

  1. Young people should be put in the center of all development issues.

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